Pink & Dallas Green Talk New Musical Project ‘You + Me’

pink-dallas-green

Ok so, I don’t think anyone ever saw this coming, but I for one have the biggest smile on my face. I mean who doesn’t love Pink and Dallas Green of City and Colour, his voice is like butter. Get your ears ready for some of the most beautiful melodic singing you have ever heard.

Alecia Moore, better known as Pink, has put aside all her glitz and glammer and acrobatic heavy performances for her latest musical project with Dallas Green, a folkish style album called rose ave. The album is out now. Take a listen on Spotify.

Both Pink and Dallas talk to Entertainment Weekly magazine and Vulture to give us some incite to how this collaboration came to be and what the album means to them:

Entertainment Weekly Interview:

EW: How did you two meet?
Pink: Mutual friends.
Dallas Green: She came to a show years ago in LA.
Pink: Carey [Hart, her husband] and you did Warped Tour together.
Green: During the war years. We met—I mean obviously, I knew who she was. We met that day after my show. That’s really how it started, the conversation about singing together. Not making a record; [we] just wanted to sit by the campfire and sing. Over the years we kept talking about it, and sort of just had a break in our all-encompassing lives, and it just happened. I know it sounds like a made-up story. I didn’t even know that she had gotten a studio rented ’til the night before.

How did you decide to call yourselves You + Me?
Pink: He got me a card.
Green: We didn’t want it to be “Pink and City and Colour.”
Pink: Our engineer was calling us the Self Deprecation Society. That was in the running.
Green: I saw this card—it said You and Me on it. It made perfect sense, ’cause it really was just the two of us. There was no boardroom meeting, no, “You should do this ’cause this will change your career.” It was just an idea from the two of us.

Is there a difference between performing as Alecia Moore and performing as Pink?
Pink: I had worked for 16 years to become good at what I do as Pink. That’s my nickname; that’s all I’ve ever been. I know exactly what to do as Pink. It’s all me. It’s not like an alter-ego. It’s like, I tour, I flip, I shout, and I cry. I know when I’m making a Pink record, it’s three years—the next three years of my life. That’s great. That’s wonderful. This is not that. This is just singing, ’cause I love to. We love music for a certain reason—music is in our bodies from birth, and what I did last night was what’s been in my body since birth.

Green, Pink, Rose Avenue—there’s a color theme going on here. Is that a coincidence?
Pink:
 Yes, that is a total coincidence. Rose Avenue is where the studio is. Our lives existed on Rose Avenue. Breakfast, lunch, dinner, beer.

The harmonies on the album are absolutely beautiful—but did you think beforehand that your styles of music would immediately blend together?
Green: I knew I could sing and I knew she could sing, but that didn’t necessarily mean it was going to work. You never know what two voices are going to sound like together. I do tons of harmonies on my records but that’s just harmonizing myself, which is a totally different thing.
Pink: Some people can’t even harmonize with themselves. It doesn’t sound right. There’s just some tone in between our voices that, when put together, sounds better—well, for me, anyway. He sounds fine without me. But I think the whole is larger than—what’s that saying, the sum of its parts? That thing.

Do you guys have any plans for the future of You+Me?
Pink: I don’t know. We don’t know. We didn’t even know there was going to be a picture that big of us when we hung it out on Rose Avenue. That’s the fun part about it: There is no plan, and that’s what I think makes it so cool.
Green: It’s not the three-year schedule. It’s not the “Okay, we’ve booked you here.”
Pink: I would like to play live. My cheeks hurt from smiling when we sing together. I’d like to do some shows together at some point.
Green: We will.
Pink: Even if it’s just in our living room for friends. My mom would come.
Green: We can do whatever we want. To your living room? Okay, we’re going to play a show in Alecia’s living room just for family.

Vulture Interview:

Why did it just happen now?
Green: I knew her big album cycle had finished in January. I assumed she’d be home, so I sent her a note, and she was like, “Yup, got this week off.”
Pink: It’s rad that we’re such good friends. I put a lot of pressure on myself when I walk into a songwriting thing. Like, “I’m gonna feel like such a dick, like a useless waste of skin.” But this time, if it didn’t work, I still got to hang out with my friend for a week. Dallas was having his own internal struggle about the whole thing. I told him, “Whatever, there’s beer, there’s wine, there’s whiskey.”

What were you struggling with, Dallas?
Green: I didn’t want her to hate me! I didn’t want to show up and have nothing to offer. I’d never collaborated, never gone into a room before with someone and just tried to write songs. Alecia only collaborates.
Pink: I’m lucky. I’ve created a space where I get to work with people I love. A lot of artists in my position go with whoever is gonna get them that No. 1 [hit], and sometimes those people aren’t very nice. They aren’t a super-nice hang. But with Dallas, we were doing it with ourselves, because we really wanted to. I felt giddy, like I was 8 years old again. My cheeks were sore from smiling.

One of the things I like about the album is the way your voices fit together.
Green: We both have such a range that either of us can take the low part and either of us can take the high part. We were able to find out which way made us comfortable. I love the parts on the record when it’s like, who is that? It’s rare for a male and female duo to do that. It almost sounds like one voice.

You guys both sound like you were really happy.
Green:  We were just in Venice, at a funky little home studio on Rose Avenue. That’s where the title comes from. It was just myself and Alecia.
Pink: That’s why I love the name You + Me. It was just us.

And it only took you a week to record the album?
Pink: We did eight songs that first week, then I had to go on tour, then we came back for two days. But if you count the amount of time we were actually working and not just at the bar, it was more like four days.

You+Me-rose ave.- Track by Track Commentary

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