Let’s Talk About The ‘Teal Pumpkin Project’

feedingbig.com

feedingbig.com

Halloween is quickly approaching, meaning that soon, there will be swarms of children outside your door, clamoring for your delicious candy. So let’s talk about those weird teal pumpkins you may have seen sitting outside some of your neighbors’ houses.

Is this some Pinterest fad? Some decorating tip? Not quite. Although the teal pumpkins are pretty enough, many people are painting pumpkins teal (or buying fake ones) to denote to other parents that their Halloween treats will be 100% allergen free this year.

For many parents with children who have severe food allergies like nuts, wheat, and dairy, Halloween is a lot scarier. Not only do they have to inspect every piece of candy their children brings home, but often, the exposure to certain food is enough to trigger a reaction.

Kids shouldn’t have to worry about rushing to the hospital on Halloween night. That’s where the Teal Pumpkin Project comes in.

A photo posted by PETIT PEONY (@petit_peony) on

The safe way to participate in the Teal Pumpkin Project is to, you know, paint a pumpkin teal. Then go to the website and print a free poster to place outside your home, to reinforce the message that you’ve got safe treats for kids.

And then you have to buy non-food-allergy alternatives for the kids who show up to your door and tell you they have an allergy. Instead of food, you can hand out little toys, like glow-in-the-dark fangs, whistles, bubbles, bouncing balls, and those bendable figurines. Sure, it doesn’t beat candy, but it’ll be very much appreciated by the children who might feel left out because of their food allergies.

A photo posted by @adu_perez13 on

The Teal Pumpkin Project began in 2014, launched as a national campaign by Food Allergy Research & Education (FARE). Last year, families across the 50 states participated in the project, along with 7 countries around the world. Over 100,000 households participated, and you can too.

About The Author
Lisa Lo Paro
Lisa is a freelance writer and bibliophile living on the outskirts of New York City. She likes 2 a.m. with a good book, takes cream in her coffee and heavily filters her photos. Check out her blog The Most Happy, her Instagram, and Twitter.