Game Of Thrones Star Emilia Clarke Was Almost Fifty Shades Of Grey’s Ana Steele

Fifty Shades of Grey could have featured Game of Thrones star Emilia Clarke — but she turned down the role. Her reason might be the biggest shocker — she said she couldn’t take the role because of the nude scenes.

Game of Thrones fans are reeling right now — Emilia Clarke’s character, Daenerys Targeryen, is introduced in a scene where she’s stripped to bathe and prepare her for her forced marriage, and the scenes following the wedding — well, suffice it to say anyone who has seen the first season of Game of Thrones would never imagine Emilia Clarke would have an objection to nude scenes or depictions of sex where consent is dubious.

However, in a recent Hollywood Reporter interview, she explains that her past nude scenes are exactly the reason she turned this one down — she doesn’t want to be labeled and typecast.

Of course, she’s also turned down a few things lately due to scheduling conflicts. The roles she has accepted are for Voice from the Stone (the role of Verena), 2015 Terminator Genisys (as Sarah Connor) and Me Before You, as Louisa Clark.

Clarke returns to filming for the next season of Game of Thrones in July, and, according to Vanity Fair, she’ll know how the story ends before you do — even if you’re an avid reader of the books.

That’s right — show runners Dan Weiss and David Benioff have confirmed what A Song of Ice and Fire readers have expected all along: the show will almost certainly catch up with, then outpace, the books. The pair say that they actually expect the upcoming season to catch up with the contents of the fifth book.

The sixth book, meanwhile, still has no publication date, but George R. R. Martin has been dropping hints on his blog that he’s focusing on the book, even skipping some conventions and trips to finish it up.

TELL US: Would you have loved Emilia Clarke in Fifty Shades of Grey, or did she make the right choice?

About The Author
Steph Bazzle
Steph Bazzle is a homeschooling mom who likes to write about justice, equality, and religious issues.