Chrissy Teigen Catches Unnecessary Heat For Her ‘Hot Nannies’ Comment

Spike TV's "Guys Choice 2014" - ArrivalsCan we joke anymore?

There are some issues that are too important, too serious, too sensitive to joke about. I wholeheartedly understand that issue, and I also know how offensive some people can be. But I also know that sometimes, celebrities can’t even make a harmless joke without catching heat.

In case you haven’t heard, Chrissy Teigen made some comments to the press recently about not wanting “hot” women around her husband; specifically, she said that even though she trusts John (Legend, her husband), she won’t hire “hot nannies” if she and John end up having children.

Here’s the full quote, as told to The New York Post at Lauren Conrad’s New York Fashion Week debut:

No hot nannies, drivers or maids. It’s an ongoing joke in my house. I do want to have kids one day, so it’s something that I have to think about. But the rule is no hot nannies. I trust John, but you never know with these men. It’s too late for me, though, because I have a hot assistant — she is cute. These days, it doesn’t really matter what you look like — sometimes cabin fever just strikes and men do the do. I have to keep an eye on my assistant now, damn! Christine, you’re done!

Teigen, who is a staunch anti-Photoshop advocate and a funny, no-filter kind of woman, has a swarm of fans who love her for her humor and body-positive attitude toward women and toward herself. She’s known for posting photos of her stretch marks on Instagram like it’s NBD (which it is) and captioning it “stretchies say hi!” She’s known for expressing her opinions on controversial videos like the recent much-debated and polarizing “Dear Fat People” that made its viral rounds on the Internet last week. She’s known for being a model who shatters the stereotypes and makes her real-world persona part of her image.

So why all the hate for a random comment that was at worst, only very slightly offensive and at best, clearly presented repeatedly as a joke? What are we really trying to change by policing the statements of celebrities, or even each other’s?

Clearly, this specific case is of the media sensationalizing comments and taking them at face value. The Post used this non-story and added a fiery headline, knowing it would catch the interest of the public and that the public, as it is wont to do, would respond in one of the only ways we know how: with outrage and claims of offense.

People claimed to be offended because Chrissy’s comments were “regressive,” as if a man can’t be faithful to his wife unless all “temptation” is removed. And it was also perceived as female hating, all of which are valid claims but here’s the thing: when did being offended become the default mode for most people? When does claims to offense erase the ability to joke? Chrissy was clearly not serious, and she exaggerated the comments for comedic effect. She’s in on the joke. She’s making fun of herself, making those comments. But we’re so conditioned to be outraged at any little thing that we’ve lost the ability to joke about the issues, so that we can make light of them.

Teigen was miffed herself at the criticism she faced after making those comments, and exasperated that she even had to explain herself. But explain herself she did, on Twitter:

 

At the end of the day, despite even this article, the Chrissy Teigen story is a non-issue. Despite her reputation as a funny woman with no filter and despite her actions time and time again that prove she is an advocate for the things that really matter, we were all too quick to lash out at her for making one perceived misstep.

About The Author
Lisa Lo Paro
Lisa is a freelance writer and bibliophile living on the outskirts of New York City. She likes 2 a.m. with a good book, takes cream in her coffee and heavily filters her photos. Check out her blog The Most Happy, her Instagram, and Twitter.